Tech’s Place in a Blue Collar World

When it comes to technology, people first think of Silicon Valley, smartphones, and social media. However, technology’s industrial role continues to surge. From power companies and their linemen to manufacturing plants and those who rely on digital imaging templates to truckers leveraging the internet of things to increase efficiency, there are many ways blue-collar industries put technology to practical use.

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Service Industries

Technology disrupted traditional service industries, like taxi services, for example. Once app developers came up with ways for independent contractors to share a platform and streamline their customer interactions, the taxi service industry found it hard to keep up. Platforms like Uber and Lyft transformed the industry. Now it is almost impossible to think of a business-to-consumer industry that doesn’t benefit from customer relationship management software and consumer-facing apps.

Electricians, plumbers, landscapers and blue-collar service industries rely on web pages to reach their target demographic, they nurture their businesses through online reviews and recommendations and they offer customers apps that provide quotes and other information. Technology helps grow small, local businesses and keeps service providers employed. There is no doubt, blue-collar companies going digital is a trend that isn’t going to stop.

Manufacturing

Computer-assisted manufacturing technologies have been around for decades, but back before smartphones and personal computers, technology was expensive and not user-friendly. Today, interfaces have improved and blue-collar employees have become increasingly sophisticated. If someone can navigate a smartphone, then they are capable of understanding how to use touchscreens and access data on the assembly line. Tech’s impact on manufacturing can be seen in numerous applications that boost efficiency and reduce waste, from 3-D printed parts to sensors that monitor temperatures and improve safety, to computerized maintenance systems that detect and fix problems without interfering with production.

The automotive, electronics and aviation industries were early adopters of technology, but late-adopting industries, like the construction, production, and other traditionally blue-collar industries, are beginning to adopt technologies that complement their mission. In addition, emerging sectors within the energy industry, such as solar and wind, are applying technologies in new and innovative ways. Both emerging industries and late-adopting industries are using tech to improve product quality and streamline delivery options.

Logistics

Shipping and freight technology has made an impact on one of the nation’s most important industries. Freight and transport companies, like AuptiX, utilize technology to increase efficiency in loading trucks and planning routes. The industry has successfully harnessed technology to increase efficiency of the delivery, lower the cost for companies and increase the quality in which the items are cared for during the shipment process.

With handheld devices, packages are scanned, pallets are tracked and manifests are documented in real-time. For complex shipments of hazardous materials, shipping technology makes it simpler for transport companies to maintain standards and regulatory compliance, even across state and international lines.

Consumer-facing apps make it possible for customers to see their package’s location, this frees up time for customer service personnel and improves customer satisfaction. Bear in mind that customers have grown accustomed to transparency in shipment procedures. Offering this service has become an industry standard. Digital tech is poised to become standard in all industries, regardless of collar color.

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